GEHU 302 | Course Introduction and Application Information

Course Name
Popular Culture
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
GEHU 302
Fall/Spring
3
0
3
6

Prerequisites
None
Course Language
English
Course Type
Service Course
Course Level
First Cycle
Course Coordinator -
Course Lecturer(s)
Assistant(s) -
Course Objectives This course to engage students in critically thinking about popular culture and its roles in society.
Learning Outcomes The students who succeeded in this course;
  • critically read popular cultural texts.
  • understand popular culture as an historical phenomenon.
  • comment on popular culture’s relationships to other types of culture and power.
  • discuss and critique popular culture in diverse cultural fields
  • discuss and critique a variety of approaches to the analysis of popular culture.
Course Content This course intends to analyze and discuss popular culture and its role in the world. We will scrutinize its major theories and contemporary discussions around it, and relate them with various recent works. We will also elaborate popular culture of Turkey and situate it within wider theoretical debates. The course consists of lectures, screenings and discussions revolving around critical analysis of and engagement with contemporary examples of film, television, adverts and new media.

 



Course Category

Core Courses
Major Area Courses
Supportive Courses
Media and Management Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Related Preparation
1 Course Introduction: Why should we study popular culture?
2 What is popular culture? Why is the distinction between “popular” and “high” culture problematic? J. Storey, Cultural Theory and Popular Culture, London and New York: Routledge, 2018. Chapter 1, P. 1-17. Stuart Hall, “Notes on Deconstructing the “Popular”” in R. Guiz and O. Z. Cruz, Popular Culture: A Reader, London, California, New Delhi: Sage Publications. P. 64-71.
3 Culture and the “Masses” R. Williams, “Culture and Masses”, in R. Guiz and O. Z. Cruz, Popular Culture: A Reader, London, California, New Delhi: Sage Publications. P. 25-32. D. Macdonald, in R. Guiz and O. Z. Cruz, Popular Culture: A Reader, London, California, New Delhi: Sage Publications. “A Theory of Mass Culture, P. 39-46.
4 Culturalism: Hoggart, Williams, Thompson, Hall and Whannel. Case study: The use of opera and classical music in advertisements J. Storey, Cultural Theory and Popular Culture, London and New York: Routledge, 2018. Chapter 3, P. 38-60.
5 Marxisms: Frankfurt School, Althusser, Gramsci, post-Marxism and cultural studies Screening: Popular music videos J. Storey, Cultural Theory and Popular Culture, London and New York: Routledge, 2018. Chapter 4, P.61-94.
6 Structuralism and Post-Structuralism Screening: Dances with Wolves (1990) J. Storey, Cultural Theory and Popular Culture, London and New York: Routledge, 2018. Chapter 6, P. 116-139.
7 Mid term exam
8 Gender and Sexuality Case study: Bitch Magazine: A Feminist Response to Popular Culture J. Storey, Cultural Theory and Popular Culture, London and New York: Routledge, 2018. Chapter 8, P. 152-186.
9 Postmodernizm: Postmodern theories of popular culture; Art and popular culture Case study: Examples from the works of Banksy J. Storey, Cultural Theory and Popular Culture, London and New York: Routledge, 2018. Chapter 10, 204-236. W. Ellsworth-Jones, Banksy: The Man Behind the Wall, Aurum Press Ltd, 2012.
10 Social Media and Social Change Screening: Documentary “Fault Lines - History of an occupation”, Al Jazeera, 2012. J. S. Juris, "Reflections on #Occupy Everywhere: Social media, public space, and emerging logics of aggregation", American Ethnologist, Volume 39 Number 2 May 2012. J. Burgess and J. Green, YouTube: Online Video and Participatory Culture, Cambridge: Polity, 2009. Chapter 3: “YouTube’s Popular Culture”
11 Popular Culture in Turkey 1: Arabesk, music and beyond. Screening: Crossing the Bridge: The Sound of Istanbul, Director: Fatih Akın Meral Özbek: “Arabesk Culture: A Case of Modernization and Popular Identity” in Rethinking Modernity and National Identity in Turkey, edited by Sibel Bozdoğan and Reşat Kasaba, 1997.
12 Popular Culture in Turkey 2: Islamic views Screening: Huzur Sokağı, ATV, 2012-2015. A. Saktanber, "We pray like you have fun": New Islamic Youth in Turkey between Intellectualism and Popular Culture", In, Fragments of Culture, D. Kandiyoti and A. Saktanber (eds). London,New York: I.B. Tauris, 2002. P. 254-276. M. Stokes, “New Islamist popular culture in Turkey”, In Music, Culture and Identity in the Muslim World: Performance, Politics and Piety, ed. K. Salhi. London: Routledge, 2013. Chapter 1.
13 Presentations Storey, J. (2001), Cultural Theory and Popular Culture, Pearson: Harlow, p. 129-137
14 Conclusion & final paper
15 Review of the Semester
16 Review of the Semester

 

Course Textbooks
References

The course uses the sources that are listed above.

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Requirements Number Percentage
Participation
1
20
Laboratory / Application
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
Presentation / Jury
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Portfolios
Midterms / Oral Exams
1
30
Final / Oral Exam
1
50
Total

Contribution of Semester Work to Final Grade
2
50
Contribution of Final Work to Final Grade
1
50
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Course Hours
Including exam week: 16 x total hours
16
3
48
Laboratory / Application Hours
Including exam week: 16 x total hours
16
Study Hours Out of Class
16
2
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
Presentation / Jury
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Portfolios
Midterms / Oral Exams
1
30
Final / Oral Exam
1
40
    Total
150

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Qualifications / Outcomes
* Level of Contribution
1
2
3
4
5
1 Adequate knowledge in Mathematics, Science and Civil Engineering; ability to use theoretical and applied information in these areas to model and solve Civil Engineering problems
2 Ability to identify, define, formulate, and solve complex Civil Engineering problems; ability to select and apply proper analysis and modeling methods for this purpose
3 Ability to design a complex system, device or product under realistic constraints and conditions, in such a way as to meet the desired result; ability to apply modern design methods for this purpose
4 Ability to devise, select, and use modern techniques and tools needed for Civil Engineering practice
5 Ability to design and conduct experiments, gather data, analyze and interpret results for investigating Civil Engineering problems
6 Ability to work efficiently in Civil Engineering disciplinary and multi-disciplinary teams; ability to work individually
7 Ability to communicate effectively in Turkish, both orally and in writing; knowledge of a minimum of two foreign languages
8 Recognition of the need for lifelong learning; ability to access information, to follow developments in science and technology, and to continue to educate him/herself
9 Awareness of professional and ethical responsibility
10 Information about business life practices such as project management, risk management, and change management; awareness of entrepreneurship, innovation, and sustainable development
11 Knowledge about contemporary issues and the global and societal effects of engineering practices on health, environment, and safety; awareness of the legal consequences of Civil Engineering solutions

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest