GEHU 203 | Course Introduction and Application Information

Course Name
Modern World History
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
GEHU 203
Fall/Spring
3
0
3
5

Prerequisites
None
Course Language
English
Course Type
Service Course
Course Level
First Cycle
Course Coordinator -
Course Lecturer(s)
Assistant(s) -
Course Objectives The objective of this course is to introduce essential aspects of the modern world history to our students. For students of political science in particular, the course facilitates a minimum understanding of modern world history that is necessary in all the other departmental courses.
Learning Outcomes The students who succeeded in this course;
  • to explain the notion of modernity in its economic, social and political dimensions from a historical perspective.
  • to explain the most important ideas that lay at the foundation of modern political history
  • to explain the revolutions (agricultural, industrial, ideological, technological, political) that marked the modern world history
  • to explain the major negative phenomena, such as colonialism and slavery, imperialism, authoritarianism and totalitarianism, political extremism and other phenomena that have marked our political modernity
  • to explain the emergence of notions fundamental for modern politics (e.g. individual and collective political rights, economic and property rights, women and minority rights) and the practices and institutions associated with them (e.g. relevant international treaties, organisations such as the UN, OSCE, Council of Europe, European Union etc.)
  • to explain the historical emergence and development of the three major types of political regimes (liberal democracy, illiberal democracy and authoritarianism/totalitarianism) as building blocks of our political modernity
Course Content The course is an introductory one and it is designed to encourage the students to study politics from a historical perspective. The content is built around academic bibliography on modern world history with a focus on political history. The bibliography is employed by the instructor in course presentations each week for two hours of the total number of three, each teaching (presentation) session ending with a set of questions. Weekly reading assignments have the role of helping students address those questions each one-hour session every week. The same research questions also constitute essay questions for the midterm and final exams (take-home). The students are expected to (1) attend all classes, (2) read the assignments, (3) get involved in the debates on theseminar themes, and (4) prepare for the exams as guided by the instructor (take-home exams).

 



Course Category

Core Courses
Major Area Courses
Supportive Courses
Media and Management Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Related Preparation
1 Introduction Explanation of the course syllabus and of the bibliography. WOODRUFF, William. 1998. A concise history of the modern world: 1500 to the present, Basingstoke: Macmillan, pp. 1-43. ALL entries in the additional bibliography.
2 Asia and Europe: 1500-1914 WOODRUFF, William. 1998. A concise history of the modern world: 1500 to the present, Basingstoke: Macmillan, pp. 1-43. FOUCAULT, Michel, 1995. Discipline and punish: The birth of the prison, translated by Alan Sheridan. New York and Toronto: Vintage Books, pp. 170-177. RELEVANT SECTIONS FROM THE ADDITIONAL BIBLIOGRAPHY.
3 Asia and Europe: 1500-1914 WOODRUFF, William. 1998. A concise history of the modern world: 1500 to the present, Basingstoke: Macmillan, pp. 1-44. RELEVANT SECTIONS FROM THE ADDITIONAL BIBLIOGRAPHY.
4 The Rise of the West and the Impact of Western Man WOODRUFF, William. 1998. A concise history of the modern world: 1500 to the present, Basingstoke: Macmillan, pp. 54-80. RELEVANT SECTIONS FROM THE ADDITIONAL BIBLIOGRAPHY.
5 “White Peril” in the East; The Expansion of the Russian and American Empires WOODRUFF, William. 1998. A concise history of the modern world: 1500 to the present, Basingstoke: Macmillan, pp. 81-135. RELEVANT SECTIONS FROM THE ADDITIONAL BIBLIOGRAPHY.
6 “White Peril” in the East; The Expansion of the Russian and American Empires WOODRUFF, William. 1998. A concise history of the modern world: 1500 to the present, Basingstoke: Macmillan, pp. 81-135. RELEVANT SECTIONS FROM THE ADDITIONAL BIBLIOGRAPHY.
7 Scientific and Industrial Revolutions WOODRUFF, William. 1998. A concise history of the modern world: 1500 to the present, Basingstoke: Macmillan, pp. 136-152. RELEVANT SECTIONS FROM THE ADDITIONAL BIBLIOGRAPHY.
8 The Great War and the Birth of Communism as a New World Religion WOODRUFF, William. 1998. A concise history of the modern world: 1500 to the present, Basingstoke: Macmillan, pp. 153-182. RELEVANT SECTIONS FROM THE ADDITIONAL BIBLIOGRAPHY.
9 Midterm Exam Take-Home Exam
10 Asia in the Interwar Years WOODRUFF, William. 1998. A concise history of the modern world: 1500 to the present, Basingstoke: Macmillan, pp. 183-202.
11 The Second World War; The Cold War and the Balance of Terror WOODRUFF, William. 1998. A concise history of the modern world: 1500 to the present, Basingstoke: Macmillan, pp. 203-227. RELEVANT SECTIONS FROM THE ADDITIONAL BIBLIOGRAPHY
12 Communist Regimes and their Collapse in the USSR and Eastern Europe WOODRUFF, William. 1998. A concise history of the modern world: 1500 to the present, Basingstoke: Macmillan, pp. 241-257. RELEVANT SECTIONS FROM THE ADDITIONAL BIBLIOGRAPHY
13 The ‘West’ after the Second World War WOODRUFF, William. 1998. A concise history of the modern world: 1500 to the present, Basingstoke: Macmillan, pp. 258-351. RELEVANT SECTIONS FROM THE ADDITIONAL BIBLIOGRAPHY.
14 The ‘West’ after the End of the Cold War WOODRUFF, William. 1998. A concise history of the modern world: 1500 to the present, Basingstoke: Macmillan, pp. 258-351. RELEVANT SECTIONS FROM THE ADDITIONAL BIBLIOGRAPHY.
15 Africa from 1500 to Decolonisation WOODRUFF, William. 1998. A concise history of the modern world: 1500 to the present, Basingstoke: Macmillan, pp. 44-53, 228-240. RELEVANT SECTIONS FROM THE ADDITIONAL BIBLIOGRAPHY.
16 Review

 

Course Textbooks

Power point presentations and other course documents provided by the instructor in electronic format on the course webpage. WOODRUFF, William. 1998. A concise history of the modern world: 1500 to the present, Basingstoke: Macmillan (main course book, available at the IUE library and in electronic PDF format as prepared by the instructor).

References

(All sources can be found in hard copies in the IUE Library) FOUCAULT, M 1995. Discipline and punish: The birth of the prison, translated by Alan Sheridan. New York and Toronto: Vintage Books. GIDDENS, Anthony, 1990. The consequences of modernity. Cambridge: Polity Press. HOBSBAWM, E 1997. Age of revolution, 1789-1848, London: Phoenix. HOBSBAWM, E 1975. Age of capital, 1848-1875, London: Phoenix. HOBSBAWM, E 1997. Age of empire, 1875-1914, London: Phoenix. HOBSBAWM, E 1995. Age of extremes: a history of the world, 1914-1991, New York: Vintage Books. MOSES, AD (ed.) 2008. Empire, colony, genocide : conquest, occupation, and subaltern resistance in world history, New York: Berghahn Books. CROWE, D 1992. The essentials of European history: 1914 to 1935, World War I and Europe in crisis, Piscataway NJ: Research & Education Association. NORTON, DH 1990. The essentials of European history: 1935 to the 1988: World War II and the iron curtain, Piscataway NJ: Research & Education Association. KAMRAVA, M 2011. The modern Middle East: a political history since the First World War, Berkeley: University of California Press. The students are also encouraged to use ANY OTHER source considered relevant for the seminar and exam topics and available in the University library, EBSCO, JSTOR, or other, academically valid internet pages. ACADEMIC HONESTY: Honesty and trust are the most fundamental pillars of learning and are necessary foundation for success and academic freedom in a university. Hence, any behavior that jeopardizes the learning environment by violating the rules of academic honesty will not be tolerated or condoned: Violations of academic honesty include but are not limited to: • Cheating or facilitating cheating • looking or attempting to look at another student's answers or allowing others to copy one's answers • copying other student’s in-class or take-home exam answers or letting others use take-home exam answers • using "cheat sheet," pre-programmed calculator if not allowed by the instructor • having someone else prepare the term project or homework or letting others use one’s homework/term project/paper • Assistance of another person in preparation of a tem paper/homework/project if not allowed by the instructor • Taking an exam for another student • Purchasing term projects or homework or other assignments • Signing in place of another student using their name/signature/student id number • Plagiarism • showing the work of another as one's own • Not properly citing an earlier own work • Submitting the same homework/paper/term project in one more one course if not allowed by the instructor • Inaccurately or inadequately citing sources including those from the Internet Violations of academic honesty can result in disciplinary action, as stated in the "Student Disciplinary Rules and Regulation" of the University. http://www.ieu.edu.tr/en/bylaws/type/read/id/13 and http://kariyer.ieu.edu.tr/en/bylaws/type/read/id/81 By enrolling in the University, each student is assumed to have read the rules and regulations regarding academic dishonesty, and lack of knowledge of this policy is not an acceptable defense.

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Requirements Number Percentage
Participation
1
10
Laboratory / Application
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
Presentation / Jury
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Portfolios
Midterms / Oral Exams
1
40
Final / Oral Exam
1
50
Total

Contribution of Semester Work to Final Grade
2
50
Contribution of Final Work to Final Grade
1
50
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Course Hours
Including exam week: 16 x total hours
16
3
48
Laboratory / Application Hours
Including exam week: 16 x total hours
16
Study Hours Out of Class
10
3
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
Presentation / Jury
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Portfolios
Midterms / Oral Exams
1
30
Final / Oral Exam
1
35
    Total
143

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Qualifications / Outcomes
* Level of Contribution
1
2
3
4
5
1 Adequate knowledge in Mathematics, Science and Civil Engineering; ability to use theoretical and applied information in these areas to model and solve Civil Engineering problems
2 Ability to identify, define, formulate, and solve complex Civil Engineering problems; ability to select and apply proper analysis and modeling methods for this purpose
3 Ability to design a complex system, device or product under realistic constraints and conditions, in such a way as to meet the desired result; ability to apply modern design methods for this purpose
4 Ability to devise, select, and use modern techniques and tools needed for Civil Engineering practice
5 Ability to design and conduct experiments, gather data, analyze and interpret results for investigating Civil Engineering problems
6 Ability to work efficiently in Civil Engineering disciplinary and multi-disciplinary teams; ability to work individually
7 Ability to communicate effectively in Turkish, both orally and in writing; knowledge of a minimum of two foreign languages
8 Recognition of the need for lifelong learning; ability to access information, to follow developments in science and technology, and to continue to educate him/herself
9 Awareness of professional and ethical responsibility
10 Information about business life practices such as project management, risk management, and change management; awareness of entrepreneurship, innovation, and sustainable development
11 Knowledge about contemporary issues and the global and societal effects of engineering practices on health, environment, and safety; awareness of the legal consequences of Civil Engineering solutions

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest