GEEC 207 | Course Introduction and Application Information

Course Name
Economic History
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
GEEC 207
Fall/Spring
3
0
3
6

Prerequisites
None
Course Language
English
Course Type
Service Course
Course Level
First Cycle
Course Coordinator
Course Lecturer(s)
Assistant(s) -
Course Objectives The aim of this course is to give students a background on economic developments and origins of contemporary society. The main focus of the course will be the emergence and the development of social and economic systems, and how these systems have come to shape our contemporary world, by giving emphasis on the European context. Keeping this aim in mind, we will first consider what economic history is (what kind of a discipline it is, how is different from economics, etc.), and then consider what in human history had paved the way to capitalism. The course will be ended with a brief discussion of the contemporary era, in which the process of globalization is said to be prevalent.
Learning Outcomes The students who succeeded in this course;
  • Will be able to analyze the evolution of economic institutions in a historical comparative perspective.
  • Will be able to explain noncapitalist economic formations.
  • Will be able to explain the functioning of current economic processes in a historical perspective.
  • Will be able to explain the importance of technology and other nonmarket institutions in the evolution of the economic process.
  • Will be able to analyze the relationship between regional, national and international economic developments in a historical context.
Course Content The aim of this course is to inform students about the historical development of economic processes and institutions and the evolution of production, distribution, consumption patterns, and the factors of production in the world and particularly in Western Europe. Some of the topics on this course include: economic processes in the ancient world and middle ages, geographical expansion of the Western world, industrial revolution, developments in agriculture, finance, banking sectors during the expansion process of the main European countries, application of technology, developments in telecommunication and transportation, the role of the state, the growth of the world economy and impact of the European industrialized countries on the rest of the world, and the economic developments of the post World War I and II.

 



Course Category

Core Courses
Major Area Courses
Supportive Courses
Media and Management Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Related Preparation
1 Introduction & terminology Chapter I (1)
2 Economic question(s) & documentary part I Chapter I (2)
3 Economic development in ancient times & the premarket society (part I) Chapter II (1) & Chapter II (2); pp. 18 29
4 Medieval Europe & the premarket society (part II) Chapter III (1) & Chapter II (2); pp. 29 44
5 Nonwestern economies on the eve of western expansion & documentary part II Chapter IV (1)
6 Europe’s overseas expansion and transformation in Europe Chapters V VI (1)
7 The emergence of market society & the age of revolution Chapter III (2), Chapter VII (1) & Chapter IV (2)
8 Paths of economic development Chapter III (2), Chapter VII (1) & Chapter IV (2)
9 The age of high imperialism & documentary part III Chapters XI XII (1)
10 The world economy in the twentieth century Chapter XIII (1) & Chapter VI (2)
11 The drift of modern economic history Chapter VII (2) & Chapter XIV (1)
12 Rebuilding of world economy Chapter XV (1)
13 World economy at the beginning of the twentieth century Chapter XV (1)
14 Review of the semester
15 Review of the semester
16 Review of the semester

 

Course Textbooks

Rondo Cameron and Larry Neal (2003) A Concise Economic History of the World, 4th Edition, Oxford University Press; and Robert L. Heilbroner (1989) The Making of Economic Society, PrenticeHall, Inc.

References

Dennis Sherman (eds.) (2006) Western Civilization, Images and Interpretations, Vol. I, McGrawHill; and Gerald Diamond (1999) Guns, Germs and Steel, W. W. Norton & Co. (also available in documentary format from National Geographic Society); and Gordon Child (1960) What Happenened in History, Pelican.; and Eric Hobsbawm, (1990) Industry and Empire, Penguin.

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Requirements Number Percentage
Participation
Laboratory / Application
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
1
10
Presentation / Jury
Project
1
20
Seminar / Workshop
Portfolios
Midterms / Oral Exams
1
30
Final / Oral Exam
1
40
Total

Contribution of Semester Work to Final Grade
60
Contribution of Final Work to Final Grade
40
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Course Hours
Including exam week: 16 x total hours
16
3
48
Laboratory / Application Hours
Including exam week: 16 x total hours
16
Study Hours Out of Class
16
3
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
1
14
Presentation / Jury
Project
1
25
Seminar / Workshop
Portfolios
Midterms / Oral Exams
1
25
Final / Oral Exam
1
30
    Total
190

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Qualifications / Outcomes
* Level of Contribution
1
2
3
4
5
1 Adequate knowledge in Mathematics, Science and Civil Engineering; ability to use theoretical and applied information in these areas to model and solve Civil Engineering problems
2 Ability to identify, define, formulate, and solve complex Civil Engineering problems; ability to select and apply proper analysis and modeling methods for this purpose
3 Ability to design a complex system, device or product under realistic constraints and conditions, in such a way as to meet the desired result; ability to apply modern design methods for this purpose
4 Ability to devise, select, and use modern techniques and tools needed for Civil Engineering practice
5 Ability to design and conduct experiments, gather data, analyze and interpret results for investigating Civil Engineering problems
6 Ability to work efficiently in Civil Engineering disciplinary and multi-disciplinary teams; ability to work individually
7 Ability to communicate effectively in Turkish, both orally and in writing; knowledge of a minimum of two foreign languages
8 Recognition of the need for lifelong learning; ability to access information, to follow developments in science and technology, and to continue to educate him/herself
9 Awareness of professional and ethical responsibility
10 Information about business life practices such as project management, risk management, and change management; awareness of entrepreneurship, innovation, and sustainable development
11 Knowledge about contemporary issues and the global and societal effects of engineering practices on health, environment, and safety; awareness of the legal consequences of Civil Engineering solutions

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest